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Magnetizing a Baby

It is possible to magnetize a baby with a few drops of water, some ordinary sugar and a teether. It’s all down to changes that take place in the brain when the baby tastes the sugar.

Neal Barnard MD, founder of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM), explains the process. Of course it’s not really magnetization, it’s the release of opiates in the brain, natural versions of morphine and heroin, that make us feel good. Barnard discusses the science underlying food addictions. Personal willpower is not necessarily to blame, chocolate, cheese, meat, and sugar all release these opioids. substances. Dr. Barnard also discusses how industry, aided by government, exploits these natural cravings, pushing us to eat more and more unhealthy foods. He suggests that a purely plant-based (vegan) diet is the solution to avoid many of these problems.

He points out how cheese and other dairy products contain natural compounds closely related to morphine, perhaps as a natural bonding chemical to ensure suckling mammals “enjoy” the suckling process. The presence of tiny quantities of these compounds in so many foods could explain why dairy products, chocolate, wheat, meat, nuts, onions, corn, tomatoes, onions, bananas, citrus fruits etc are common dietary triggers of migraine, for instance, users are simply overdosing on the opiates and then suffering withdrawal symptoms. And, as to cardiovascular disease, stroke, and heart attack…cardiologists know that if a man in his fifties presents with impotence, there is a one in four chance that he will have a heart attack or stroke within two years. Barnard blames our addiction to meat and even got cattle ranchers in the mid-west to prick up their ears when he relayed that fact and had them asking for his tofu recipes and tips on cooking brown rice.

Anyway, it’s a long video (40 minutes) but makes very interesting viewing.

<br /> Watch on Google Video

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