Melamine Contaminated Food List

melamine-candy via LA TimesBefore you check out the following items, please click here first to grab the Sciencebase newsfeed. I’ll be updating the melamine news over the next few days, and the RSS newsfeed system allows you to keep up to date with the Sciencebase site without having to check back by adding our headlines to your Google account, My Yahoo, Bloglines or your active bookmarks in your browser.

As the melamine in milk products from China problem continues to grow apace, Sciencebase presents a succinct list of melamine contaminated food list culled from the most recent news results on the subject. This is by no means an exhaustive list nor is it a condemnation of any particular products, it’s here merely to raise awareness of what is happening with regard to the melamine in milk scandal.

  • Powdered baby milk.
  • HK finds melamine in Chinese-made cheesecake.
  • Cookies With Melamine Found in Netherlands.
  • Mr Brown coffee products.
  • Manufacturing giant Unilever recalls melamine tainted tea. CNN is also reporting that the Hong Kong authorities Sunday (October 5) announced that two recalled candy products made by British confectioner Cadbury had high levels of melamine.
  • Melamine Detected in Two More Ritz Snacks.
  • More Chinese-made sweets recalled in Japan.
  • White Rabbit brand Chinese candy contaminated: Asian health officials.
  • Lipton, Glico and Ritz the latest businesses to be affected by milk powder scandal.
  • Hong Kong finds traces of melamine in Cadbury products.
  • Recalled Melamine Milk Products include Asian versions of Bairong grape cream crackers, Dove chocolate, Dreyers cake mix, Dutch Lady candy, First Choice crackers, Kraft Oreo wafer sticks, M&Ms, Magnum ice cream, Mentos bottle yoghurt, Snickers funsize, Yili hi-cal milk, Youcan sesame snacks and others. Testing of some of those has already proven negative.
  • Melamine Found in More China-Made Products, including Heinz DHA+AA baby cereal.
  • 305 Chinese dairy-based products temporarily banned in Korea.
  • US bloggers have gone so far as to uncover dozens of products recalled in China that were still on the shelves of their local supermarkets.
  • 31 new milk powder brands found tainted.

Just for the record, this is not, as was suggested on a couple of blogs linking here, a definitive, complete list. I will update it as and when new information comes to light. Check out the previous posts for more information in the background to this news story and for further discussion on the issues surrounding the melamine in milk products scandal: Melamine Scandal Widens and (2008-09-29) Milky Melamine.

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45 thoughts on “Melamine Contaminated Food List”

  1. The Cadbury bars we get here are made at the Hersey Plant (it’s the recipe that’s UK) in the US. I do hope that it means that there is no melamine in my chocolate.

  2. huge American corporations are using slave labor in China to up their profit margins into the stratosphere,creating a people to blame while they manufacture poisoned foods for the Chinese to die on and importing these same foods to up the protein quotient, so that our children may be poisoned as well.

  3. The obvious question to me is why are melamine and melamine scrap being put into milk and animal feed? What we are seeing here is not just accidental leaching of this substance, whether the particular form is toxic or not, into the food supply, but an intentional addition of it to “cut” the milk with a cheap “filler.” And why not just use US and Canadian milk suppliers who have a high quality product? Just go on the website tradekey.com and look at all the offerings of milk products of Chinese origin at CHEAP prices. That is the source of the problem here—people who are willing to cut corners on quality and safety to make more profit on their product. It comes down to a question of ETHICS.

    I shop locally at farmers markets, where I often buy better quality for less than supermarket prices. For items I buy in supermarkets, I do my homework and purchase brands that have consistently offered high quality and are healthy. This usually means I do not buy mainstream commercial brands for my family. Even within the “natural foods” industry there are now questionable companies buying up smaller, profitable natural companies. Find out more at cornucopia.org.

    Money is power. Be willing to do homework on brands you buy and use your dollars to vote for a better quality life.

  4. what you say is true. but it is unacceptable to hear comments on the news whrein they actually do say that some melamine contamination are in levels known not to cause any harm… Now why should there be even any levels at all. If you say carry over from containers or trays etc.. that would be so miniscule it would not even be detected. but for some products to be considered accetable because they have only 1% melamine is totally out of the question. and as per the big industries NEstle etc. they knew what they were putting into their products. 5 years from now when all this bruhaha has died down whats to say the chinese or others they wont be up to same antics again? as far back as i can recall, here in asia the chinese m erchants are always being accused of diluting or falsifying products….. (meat in buns not real meat, etc. ) pirated discs, fake bags etc….etc…. etc…..

  5. It’s impossible to specify something as pure. There is always going to be contamination even if that is at the parts per trillion level and below. A factory may have a line that has a melamine polymer component, a sorting tray perhaps, so there could be minute amounts of melamine leached from the equipment with use that makes its way into the product. Setting a safety limit means that the QC/QA guys can check for levels above what is safe. It’s not to give manufacturers permission to deliberately add the stuff, but to give them reasonable testing limits.

  6. Thanks, David, for posting this article and to the others who have already submitted comments.

    My question is, why are “safe” limits for melamine set? Why should there be any melamine in our foods? When reports like that seen today of “trace” amounts found in US baby formula are issued, it downplays the fact that melamine is, in fact, present.

    Perhaps someone could explain why we should tolerate ANY melamine being added to our food?

  7. Hi david. I live in the philippines and due to so much corruption and highly unreliable government regulation there are so many products on the lists that are so blatantly being sold even by our high end grocery, cadbury had already been dumping their chocolates in our market when salmonella contamination story came out. the animal food products recalled worldwide??? they were selling it here at veterinary hospitals…..

    anyways – a new produc suddenly flooding the market is a 3 in 1 coffee mix called OLD TOWN (manufactured by WHITE CAFE SDN BHD) coming out of Malaysia. Any info on tis brand by any chance over there?

    thanks

    F. Kramer

  8. As a milk prodcuer in Canada, yes that right a dairy farmer I will have you know that both Canada and the U.S have the highest milk saftey standards in the world. Their is absolutley no other products mixed in with milk or powdered milk. Canada and the U.S produces more than enough milk to supply all of our marker needs and yes we makes loads of powdered milk for use in baked and processed goods. What baffles me is why we allow milk or any food product across our borders from countries who do not in anyway meet the required standards our own food producers must meet? Go ahead, drink american milk, it is pure and sterlized and good for you. As for the baked goods and processed food producers, they the ones with the greed problem since they perfer to pay less for poisoness milk rather than pay the going price for home grown safe dairy products.

  9. I guess we better just stick to the farmer’s market and avoid all processed foods as this melamine scare has reached out to all parts of the globe and not just w/ asian named products, either. Maybe we were better off before the the processed food explosion occurred in the 1970’s. Incidentally, that is when I gained a significant amount of weight – when processed food hit the market!

  10. What makes anyone think for one minute that this isn’t happening in the US or Canada. Greed always out weights common sense..

  11. http://www.brasschecktv.com/page/463.html

    The above link from Brass check TV reports that 2 MILLION POUNDS OF CHINESE POWDERED MILK has been imported into the US for use by name brand and other food manufacturers here. A small trickle of US businesses are starting to advertise “China Free” on their food products. We must all DEMAND that by calling companies whose products we buy. If we EN MASSE call the customer service numbers and STOP BUYING until they agree, they will get the message.

    Maybe it is time for MOM to begin making treats again…without powdered milk.

  12. Don’t eat those!

    The little chocolate coins are not safe for kids to eat this Halloween.
    They are made in China and contain the Melamine that childrens deaths were
    related to recently. !!!!!!!

    With Halloween coming soon, pass this on to your family and friends.

    Sherwood’s Milk Chocolate Pirate’s Gold Coins from China contain
    melamine.
    It is true, Read the full story at the following link from Snopes:

    http://www.snopes.com/food/warnings/coins.asp

  13. It sickens me that greed gets in the way of being morally honest and concerned, but hey, we live in the biggest country that still continues to sell cigarettes, though it’s a proven lung cancer and killer. The money I guess is the real ‘drug’. The asian stores in our city has not taken away or bothered to notify its customers of the tainting, most of the products come from those companies who were found with the poisoned products, the instant coffees, the cookies and cakes, I went in there during the height of it and saw that one of the condensed milk brands was still being sold there, went bought one and still the clerks said not a word. Am I wrong in that there seems to be a lack of human connection going on here? How do I go about having the police come in and ransack their store for selling those products?

  14. do we have to be scared with the product names and not buy ’em, or should we be more concerned with the manufacturers? what about those product brands which are not from china, indonesia and malaysia? please just be more specific with the manufacturer’s name or place..

  15. To be honest, Hazel, I think you should be more concerned with the fact that you’re anticipating eating quantities of cheap, sugar-rich and fatty junk food, than any amount of putative contamination with melamine.

  16. I think you’re right to be concerned Nalia, checking county of origin on any cited products you come across in your country is a good idea, but there is still no clear picture as to the actual extent of the problem. This article and the related posts I’ve written are still getting thousands of readers, so it’s definitely an ongoing concern. By way of an update, last I read there are still 3600 sick babies in China who are thought to have been affected by melamine in milk.

  17. I had a question in regards to the melamine found in products. Are these products from Chinese factories such as Cadbury, Ritz and other, also sold in the US in common supermarket shelves or on Asian store shelves? Or do these companies also have American factories where the products are made and should I do more research on the companies themselves to determine if they are solely producing the products in America ?

    Thanks for your help,

    Nalia

  18. My family has a tradition of eating “steamed buns”. These are usually made in China, and since they include a bread shell, which presumably has milk in the recipe, I wonder if there is melamine? I haven’t seen any reference to these in the various articles I’ve read, but maybe this is because they are not commonly known in the west.

  19. Don’t get spooked this Halloween – a recall has been issued for Sherwood brand foil-wrapped Pirate’s Gold chocolate coins because they contain melamine. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is warning the public not to eat, distribute or sell the candy. It is sold across Canada by Costco and may also have been sold in bulk packages or as individual pieces at various dollar and bulk stores. However, there have actually been no reported cases of ill health caused by eating these products.

    http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/corpaffr/recarapp/2008/20081008e.shtml

  20. The people responsiblit surely knew that it was harmful to children and humans, how could they use this stuff in infant milk? what are organisation like WHO planing to do about this.?Can they make a clean sweep of products with Melamine from all the markets, some of these products are still on the shelves in Sri Lank (Oocomate, cadbury chocolate and who knows what). How soon will it be safe for children to have their milk. Company’s like Nesley & Fontera should have made dam sure they had nothing to do with Chinese produce, after all they make make enough of money.

  21. China is trying to kill all humans and their pets. An international law suit should be issued on China. I’m a chinese living in other country, but i really feel ashamed of what chinese would do go earn a few cents more of profit. They would even go to the extend of killing their own race. Those people in china are really bast@rds. Please impose a self ban on ALL china food products! Don’t even buy their vegetables as I heard that they are tainted with fabric/industrial dyes!

  22. this is ridiculous! sometimes i would eat snacks from super markets, but now i’m too scared and furious to even look at them. the companies should think of all the little innocent children that could die because of this. especially babies who have yet a far journey of life to go.

  23. Is melamine in plastic dinnerware something to be concerned about? We noticed we have a Hanna Montana dinner set my daughter purchased that states it is 100% melamine.

    Mary Ann Howard

  24. Why are our formerly trusted food corporations so insanely self absorbed in profits that they have discarded their inherent ethical responsibility to the people that purchase their products? Those of us who have assumed that the FDA has been diligent in the execution is the primary reason for their existence, have been victimized and deceptively misled.

    Once again, the American public has been the gullible guinea pig, struggling to survive under the inept and lacklustre agency that we pay to protect our food supply. Venomous, unconscionable foreign and domestic suppliers, whose only diet is money, should be deprived of their lifestyles and incarcerated the remainder of their pitiful lives.

  25. That would appear to be a rather pertinent paper on an animal study of melamine toxicity, Cyril, concluding as it does:

    “Although melamine and cyanuric acid appeared to have low toxicity when administered separately, they induced extensive renal crystal formation when administered together. The subsequent renal failure may be similar to acute uric acid nephropathy in humans, in which crystal spherulites obstruct renal tubules.”

  26. Via email:

    You may want to recover a recent animal study published in the American Journal of Veterinary Research (Sept 08) from Reimschuessel and coworkers supporting the toxicity of melamine when combined with cyanuric acid. As suggested by WHO, cyanuric acid may also be present in melamine powder:

    Am J Vet Res. 2008 Sep;69(9):1217-28.

    Evaluation of the renal effects of experimental feeding of melamine and cyanuric acid to fish and pigs.

    Links:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18764697
    http://www.who.int/csr/media/faq/QAmelamine/en/index.html

  27. You raise an interesting point Sue, but it’s not one I’ve been able to verify. Are you sure that they “permit” the deliberate addition of melamine under Thai FDA regulations, is it not simply that they have safe limits below which manufacturers need not worry about the quantity of melamine. That would seem more likely. But, if you have a citation (in English), I’ll take a look. Any readers familiar with Thai law may wish to contribute at this point.

    According to the WHO FAQ on melamine here: “Addition of melamine into food is not approved by the FAO/WHO Codex Alimentarius (food standard commission), or by any national authorities.”

  28. Via email:

    Melamine is not secretly added to milk powder by some Chinese milk factories. According to the Food and Drug Administration in Thailand melamine is legally permitted in milk products at the ratio: 1mg/kg in milk powder, and 2.5mg/kg for sweets, biscuits etc. The Chinese companies in question had exceeded the permitted levels. This information begs many answers.

    Why was such a law passed?

    Did it have a public airing?

    When was it passed?

    Is Thailand the only country to allow the addition of melamine to its food and drinks?

    What other chemicals are permitted in our foodstuffs?

    Why have all the media outlets like CNN, BBC etc misinformed the public?

  29. Wayne, I certainly am not a Bush insider, I do, however, live in what I am sure the Bush-Blair league were calling the 51st State in the 1990s, the good-old U of K.

  30. Do you feel like you are living in a third world country yet… If not you must be one of the Bush administration’s insiders…
    We have no jobs , we lose our democracy and freedom..
    We no longer have the right to have our votes to be counted.
    Our economy has been sent overseas.
    Our military is becoming a private corporate military police force.
    Do you really believe we still are living in the same country in which our forefathers fought , died and created for us…
    We we are so chicken s… we don’t deserve it anyway…..We do not have the guts to keep it…..

  31. The pervasive nature of melamine in industry is a clear indication that many companies we have come to depend upon for sustenance do not adequately test their raw materials prior to incorporating them into production. Serious testing occurs when a vendor of melamine is getting qualifed as an ‘approved supplier’ in the hopes that they can gain the business. Becoming an approved vendor only happens after procurement pushes for the supplier seeing their are competitive and, moreover can offer a substantial savings to the company. Once approved the new prime vendor needs only to meet demands for deliveries and keep the price steady so the food producer can go about their business of dominating the market, being competitive and profiting as much as they possibly can. Certifications for on-going shipments to the food company usually are no more than a one page statement attesting to the continuing quality as per the original acceptance and cite lot numbers and such for traceability. Like Wall Street, we know that if left to his own devices man will sink to the lowest possible level when money is at hand. Melamine acts as an extender, a cheap filler that makes room for a big profit. Add the savings of melamine junk powder to the price increases in food over the past year or two and wonder why they cannot adequately test these incoming raw materials on-site. These are massive companies we are hearing about with sales and profits in the billions of dollars. Most of them have good labs with decent staff and analytical equipment that would pick up melamine in a heartbeat. But that is not what this is about. This is about money, profits and getting caught. Nothing more. Poison your child, your parent, your spouse but look at the profits. How sad.

  32. Don’t you just love those wonderful Bush deregulation?! and if McInsane and Mooseilini get in the WH, it will be a even bigger nightmare.

    OBAMA/BIDEN 08

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